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DSLAM Coverage F.A.Q.

Click on the 'DSLAM Coverage F.A.Q.' link a second time to remove this F.A.Q. or on the 'X' in the corner.
cyan are locations that have active TPG ADSL2+ DSLAMs
yellow are locations that will soon have active TPG ADSL2+ DSLAMs
red are the locations of other nearby exchanges
Redis an area where the length of the copper cable from the DSLAM location is up to 1.5km in length.
Yellowis an area where the length of the copper cable from the DSLAM location is from 1.5km up to 3km in length.
Greenis an area where the length of the copper cable from the DSLAM location is from 3km up to 4.5km in length.
Blueis an area where the length of the copper cable from the DSLAM location is over 4.5km in length.
Magentais an area that is covered by a sub-exchange. ADSL2+ will not be available via this sub-exchange.
They will be coming in the near future.
They will be coming in the near future.
Distance: This is the approximate distance from the point selected, it is not the distance from the exchange. Where the distance is <100m this means there is a TPG connection within 100m of the selected point. The first blue circle, from the inside out represents 100m around the selected point. Subsequent circles are at 200m, 500m and 1km.

Protocol: This is the protocol negotiated between the modem and dslam for a given connection. Some connections can be using an ADSL protocol if they are using an ADSL modem that can not handle ADSL2+. But they could also be using an ADSL protocol if there is high frequency noise on the phone line which interferes with ADSL2+. ADSL2 is a protocol in between ADSL2+ and ADSL.

Sync Down/Up (Kbps): This is the speed that modem has synchronised at.

SNR Down/Up (dB): This is the Signal to Noise Ratio of this connection. The typical SNR for ADSL2+ connections on TPG dslams is 6dB.

Atten Down/Up (dB): This is the Line Attenutation for this connection. Attenuation is proportional to the distance from the exchange. The lower this number is, the faster the connection will be.
The average sync for a given zone is the average sync speed of customers connected within each of these zones.
Actual sync speed can be affected by a number of different factors. The average sync speed should only be taken as a guide, not as a fact. Some users will be able to connect at higher than the sync average in these zones, other will be less.
Not everyone has an ADSL2+ capable modem, so we've listed the average sync speed based on the protocol the customer has used to connect to the DSLAM. ADSL2 connections have been omitted from these averages.
The averages are based on the customers in these zones. There may only be a small number of active users within these zones, and more might be using one protocol than the other.
No. They are based on what we know of the probable cable distance of existing customers and the likely layout of the cables. Generally the cables won't cross over water features, railroads, major roads, private property. They will tend to follow along the edges of the local streets.
No. They are based on what we know of the location of existing customers. They are also based on the property boundaries, which Google makes available as part of its service.
No. Your phone line may be on a rim or in a pair-gains situation. A conclusive test can only be done upon registering for a service.
tpg.maps@tpg.com.au can be used to report errors. Such as the exchange being marked in the wrong location, or if an address falls on the wrong side on an exchange boundary.